Filters and Layers FAQs

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How do I use layers?

In  Search, you can use layers to focus your search and weed out properties that you don't want to track.

Example:

Say you want to farm the neighborhood you live in for potential listings. We recommend applying the Ownership Time and Home Equity layers to find your market neighborhood.

Since we know that people typically sell their homes every 7 to 12 years, you'd select the Ownership Time layer and set the minimum to 7. When you click Apply, all the blue dots that don't fit this criterion disappear from the map.

We know that if a person doesn't have enough equity, they aren't eligible to sell. To filter based on equity, set the Home Equity layer minimum to 250,000. When you click Apply, more ineligible blue dots will disappear.

From here, you can use the map tools to draw a shape around the area that you want to farm and add to carts.

For more information on the available layers, visit the Remine Filters and Layers article. 

What are the use cases for using Remine filters and layers?
  • Sell Score:  We recommend using the Sell Score filter alongside other filters to increase accuracy. For example, you could combine Sell Score, Ownership Time, and Home Equity.
  • Absentee: You can use this filter to identify people who may be tired of renting their property and are looking to sell or tenants who are renting and may be ready to buy.
  • Flood Zone: You can use this filter to ensure that you are not pulling listings that fall in high-risk zones unless your buyers are willing to pay for expensive flood insurance.
  • Building Type: Say you want to work directly with condos. Using this filter, you pair the Building Type and Home Equity filters to find condo owners with enough equity to sell. You can also add the Sell Score filter to narrow your results to those who are likely to sell within the next year.
  • Land Use: Say you have a client who is interested in a parcel of land, but they are concerned about the zoning of the empty parcel of land across the street. You can view this data instantly with Remine.
  • Distressed Deals: You can use this filter to find potential opportunities for investors.
  • Airbnb: You can use this filter if you're working with someone who wants to rent a property. You can use the Airbnb layer to identify popular areas for rentals and average short-term rental prices. Alternatively, you can use this filter if you're working with a buyer who doesn't want to live in an area with lots of short-term rentals. You can use the Airbnb layer to identify areas with fewer short-term rental properties.
How does Remine identify cash buyers?

The Cash Buyers overlay displays properties that were paid for in cash.

We reference the transaction date and whether a mortgage was taken out on the property within 48 hours before or after that date. You can confirm the exact mortgage date on the Property Details page.

When you click Cash Buyers, flags appear for any properties in the area that we've determined were cash sales. This is an overlay, rather than a filter because applying the Cash Buyers overlay does not remove any blue dots.

What if I can't find distressed deals?

If you can't find distressed deals it's possible that your state doesn't require lenders to report all of these document types. Check your state's foreclosure laws for more information.

Alternatively, if your state's foreclosure laws say it is reported, it is possible we could be missing data. If you believe the latter is more likely, please Submit a Bug and include corresponding documents, if any.

How does the Airbnb overlay work?

Airbnb is a company that specializes in vacation home rentals. Individuals can use Airbnb to set up short-term rentals for their own properties.

The Airbnb overlay in Remine displays flags for available Airbnb rentals in the area. Airbnb does not publically reveal property addresses for security reasons. Specific addresses are only provided to guests after they book a rental. 

Since we don't receive addresses from Airbnb, the flags displayed in Remine don't correspond to any particular blue property dots, and you cannot filter for Airbnbs. However, the flags will appear within the neighborhood or block of the rental, so the Airbnb layer is useful for identifying the concentration of short-term rental properties in a given area.

To learn more about Airbnb, visit the Airbnb Help Center.

How does the Flood Zone filter work?

Flood zones are geographic areas that FEMA defines according to flood risk levels. Remine's Flood Zone filter relies on FEMA flood maps to categorize properties into various risk zones.

Don't see flood zone data in your area? Some areas are currently unmapped by FEMA. Check out the FEMA Flood Map Service Center for the latest FEMA Flood Map Data.

Tip: Terms to Know
  • National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP): The NFIP aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures by providing affordable insurance to property owners, renters, and businesses. NFIP also encourages communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations.
  • Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM): The official map of a community on which FEMA has delineated both the special hazard areas and the risk premium zones applicable to the community.
  • Base Flood Elevation (BFE): The computed elevation to which floodwater is anticipated to rise during the base (1% annual chance) flood event.
What are the FEMA Flood Zone Designations?

The following zones are depicted on community FIRMs or Flood Hazard Boundary Maps. Each zone reflects the severity or type of flooding in the area.

Undetermined Risk Areas

Zone Description
D Areas with possible but undetermined flood hazards. No flood hazard analysis has been conducted. Flood insurance rates are commensurate with the uncertainty of the flood risk.

Moderate to Low-Risk Areas

In communities that participate in the NFIP, flood insurance is available to all property owners and renters in these zones.

Zone Description
B and X (shaded) Area of moderate flood hazard, usually the area between the limits of the 100-year and 500-year floods. B zones are also used to designate base floodplains of lesser hazards, such as areas protected by levees from a 100-year flood, or shallow flooding areas with average depths of less than 1 foot or drainage areas less than 1 square mile.
C and X (unshaded) Area of minimal flood hazard usually depicted on Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) as above the 500-year flood level. Zone C may have ponding and local drainage problems that don't warrant a detailed study or designation as a base floodplain. Zone X is the area determined to be outside the 500-year flood and protected by levee from a 100-year flood.

High-Risk Areas

In communities that participate in the NFIP, properties that fall within High-Risk zones are subject to mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements.

Zone Description
A Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding and a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. Because detailed analyses are not performed for such areas; no depths or base flood elevations are shown within these zones.
AE The base floodplain where base flood elevations are provided. AE Zones are now used on new format FIRMs instead of A1-A30 zones.
A1-A30 These are known as numbered A Zones (e.g., A7 or A14). This is the base floodplain where the FIRM shows a BFE (old format).
AH Areas with a 1% annual chance of shallow flooding, usually in the form of a pond, with an average depth ranging from 1 to 3 feet. These areas have a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. Base flood elevations derived from detailed analyses are shown at selected intervals within these zones.
AO River or stream flood hazard areas, and areas with a 1% or greater chance of shallow flooding each year, usually in the form of sheet flow, with an average depth ranging from 1 to 3 feet. These areas have a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. Average flood depths derived from detailed analyses are shown within these zones.
AR Areas with a temporarily increased flood risk due to the building or restoration of a flood control system (such as a levee or dam). Mandatory flood insurance program requirements will apply, but rates will not exceed the rates for unnumbered A zones if the structure is built or restored in compliance with Zone AR floodplain management regulations.
A99 Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding that will be protected by a Federal flood control system where construction has reached specific legal requirements. No depths or base flood elevations are shown within these zones.
High Risk - Coastal Areas
V Coastal areas with a 1% or greater chance of flooding an additional hazard associated with storm waves. These areas have a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. No base flood elevations are shown within these zones.
VE, V1-V30 Coastal areas with a 1% or greater chance of flooding and an additional hazard associated with storm waves. These areas have a 26% chance of flooding over the life of a 30-year mortgage. Base flood elevations derived from detailed analyses are shown at selected intervals within these zones.
How do I interpret Sell Score?

The Sell Score model searches for underlying patterns based on available data. This means that agents will often have important information about a property that isn't included in the Sell Score model. For this reason, we recommend combining Sell Score with other layers, like Home Equity, to most effectively identify your target market.

Properties can have a Sell Score of High, Medium, or Low.

  • High - The property is in the top 5% of properties that are likely to sell in the next 6 months.
  • Medium - The property is in the next 15% of properties that are likely to sell in the next 6 months.
  • Low - The property is in the lower 80% of properties, meaning it's less likely to sell in the next 6 months than High or Medium properties.
What is predictive analytics?

Predictive analytics involves using historical data with machine learning and artificial intelligence to predict what will happen in the future. We analyze historical data with a mathematical model that considers key trends and patterns. We then apply this model to current data to predict what will happen next. 

How accurate is the Sell Score?

A High Sell Score property is 2 to 6 times more likely to transact in the next 6 months than a randomly selected property.

What does this mean?
  • If you select 100 off-market homes at random, on average, 2 to 3 of those properties will likely sell in the next 6 months.
  • If you select 100 off-market homes with a High Sell Score, 5 to 20 of those properties will likely sell in the next 6 months.
Tip: Using the Sell Score in conjunction with other layers, like Home Equity and Ownership Time, can increase the probability that you're targeting properties that are likely to sell.


How do we measure the Sell Score's accuracy?

We measure the Sell Score's performance through an equation that compares properties with a High Sell Score to the homes that have actually sold. We run this equation in limited geographic areas to calculate accuracy among various markets.

Why should I use the Sell Score?
The purpose of predictive analytics is to help you prioritize your time, so you can reach out to the right people with the right message. The Sell Score is a tool to help with prioritization. While you may not have the time or resources to send out 10,000 mailers to build your brand, you can instead focus on 100 properties with High Sell Scores and yield better results.
How often does Remine calculate the Sell Score?

We calculate Sell Scores biweekly to keep the scores as up to date as possible. Not every property will see a difference with each Sell Score update, but an average of about 5% of properties change each month.

A property's Sell Score may change over time as we receive the new or updated information. The Sell Score model is always changing and improving, so Sell Score changes are a good thing.

How is Sell Score calculated?

We calculate Sell Score using weighted values, so you may occasionally come across some surprising results (e.g., a property that transacted within the last year with a high Sell Score).

The following are the primary variables that affect the Sell Score:

  • Property attributes (e.g., square footage, bedrooms/bathrooms, and current valuation).
  • Property transaction history (e.g., time since last sale, current mortgage(s), and foreclosure history).
  • Neighborhood averages of the previous two variables, for many different neighborhoods (e.g., by ZIP code, by city, and by state).

When any of these data points change, the Sell Score changes accordingly.

Why don't I see a Sell Score on this property?
We disable Sell Score for active listings and leave it disabled until 6 months after the property has sold, the listing has expired, or the listing has been canceled.
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